Swedish Medical Center Announces Partnership with Loveland Ski Club: Love What Moves You!

(Englewood, CO) Swedish Medical Center is proud to announce a three year, exclusive partnership with the Loveland Ski Club: Love What Moves You. The partnership is generating extra excitement as both Swedish Medical Center employees and Loveland Ski Team members are glued to the Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter Games to see the young favorite Mikaela Shiffrin compete. Over the past 4 years Shiffrin has competed and trained at Loveland Ski Area in preparation. Shiffrin placed fifth in her Olympic debut, missing a medal by 0.23 seconds in the Giant Slalom. At only 18 years old, Shiffrin is a favorite in the upcoming Ladies’ Slalom.

IMG_7631

The relationship between Swedish Medical Center and Loveland Ski Club is one that will provide education and injury prevention for club members and their families as well as medical directorship of the club. Additionally, Swedish Medical Center provides a one-call option to club members and their families for healthcare resources: 1-855-SWEDSPRT (1-855-793-7778).

“Skiing is such a part of the culture of Colorado,” said Mary M. White, President and CEO Swedish Medical Center. “We are very excited to have the opportunity to be a part of not only a Colorado past time, but also a club and a mountain that attracts skiers from across the Front Range. It’s members of our community that are enjoying skiing at Loveland and we want to serve them in every way that we can.”

The Loveland Ski Club consists or more than 100 racers, ranging in age from five to 20-years-old, 12 coaches and 82 families who live throughout the Front Range.

“Partnering with Swedish is a natural fit for us,” said John Hale, Director of Loveland Ski Club. “They are such a figure in the community, they are a Level One Trauma Center and while they have expertise in the types of injuries we can see in this sport, they also have a commitment to education throughout the community.”

The health education and injury prevention will be a combination of programs selected by and created for the club members and their families, as well as seminars from the Spirit of Women program providing age appropriate and relevant health and wellness topics. Seminars are open to the public and include everything from, ‘It’s a Slippery Slope: Injury Prevention’ to ‘Hit Me With Your Best Shot’ a seminar about teenage vaccines.IMG_7747

Medical directorship is provided by Orthopedic Physicians of Colorado and if needed, the orthopedic trauma team consisting of Wade Smith, MD and Steve Morgan, MD in the event of a traumatic injury.

“We believe in education and injury prevention,” said John Reister, MD of OPC. “We also understand that ski racing is an extreme sport and injuries do happen. We are excited to provide fast, quality, comprehensive care to the racers and families of the Loveland Ski Club.”

This partnership is another way Swedish Medical Center is continuing their long tradition of being involved in the community they serve and providing education and comprehensive care. For more information visit www.SwedishHospital.com or visit us at our booth at one of the many races hosted by the Loveland Ski Club throughout the season.

 

About Swedish Medical Center (www.SwedishHospital.com)

Swedish Medical Center in Englewood, Colorado, part of HealthONE, serves as the Rocky Mountain Region’s referral center for neurotrauma and as the region’s first Joint Commission certified Comprehensive Stroke Center, a recognized leader in the most advanced stroke care. Swedish offers patients the highest quality care and the most advanced technologies and treatments in nearly every medical specialty and is an eight time winner of the National Research Corporation Consumer Choice Award and a Top 100 Hospital recognized by Reuters. An acute care hospital with 368 licensed beds, Swedish is located in the south metro Denver area where it has been a proud member of the community for more than 100 years. Annually, Swedish cares for more than 200,000 patients with a team of 2,000 dedicated employees, 500 volunteers and more than 1,600 physicians.

About Loveland Ski Club
Our goal is to provide world-class alpine ski training, close to home, combined with exceptional coaching and curriculum. We offer a high-quality, dedicated training environment that is meticulously prepared, technologically advanced and well-staffed. In this setting, an athlete has every opportunity to reach his or her potential, whether that be a lifelong love of the sport, USSA competitions, FIS racing, the Collegiate ranks, the National team, World Cup, or the Olympic Games. We provide this training in a unique setting that allows an athlete to live in their own family home, attend their own school and still have essential access to world-class training. In this pursuit, we are passionately committed to acquiring, developing, and perfecting fundamental skills. We place a priority on helping our athletes develop their fundamental skills because we firmly believe that these fundamentals provide the structural basis for becoming both a successful racer and lifetime skier.

 

##

 

A Wounded Warrior’s Story of Recovery

Taking orders isn’t something Senior Master Sergeant Martin Smith is used to. The active duty Air Force member and father of four is usually the one telling others how things are done. But a recent turn of events in Martin’s life led him to become the one taking orders from his doctors at MOTUS also known as Mountain Orthopedic Trauma Surgeons at Swedish. HPIM2443

In August 2012, Martin was on his way home from work in Colorado Springs. This was a commute he often traveled on his motorcycle. “There was a lot of construction that day,” said Martin. “I wasn’t aware that the road was down to one lane and as I braked, I slide downhill, swerved and hit the car in front of me.” Martin severely broke his left leg in multiple places. Lying on the ground, he knew there was a big problem due to the amount of blood coming from his leg. He took his belt and made a tourniquet to stop the bleeding as someone else from the scene came to his aid. “This guy came to help me and held the tourniquet in place until AirLife came to take me to the hospital,” explains Martin.

He was rushed to Swedish Medical Center where he was immediately assessed by orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Wade Smith. “Martin had suffered an open tibia fracture,” explains Dr. Smith. “Not only were bones of the leg shattered, the skin and muscles were torn off leaving the bone exposed to infection.” Due to the severity of Martin’s injury, Dr. Smith was unable to save his entire leg. “In some cases of severe limb trauma, amputation is unavoidable and in fact, can provide better long term function than a severely damaged leg. However, it is critical to use all means to preserve as much of the limb as possible to enhance future function and return to life,” says Dr. Smith. Martin underwent a below knee amputation.

“I was in a state of shock and never thought I was going to lose some of my leg,” said Martin. “I wasn’t really able to soak it all in until after surgery.” He received a prosthetic and did months of post-surgery therapy. “It was a stressful time for me but Dr. Smith always knew what to say to calm me down in the situation. One thing he said that changed my life around was to stop being a patient and start being an athlete again, so I did.”

Martin swam competitively in high school and has always considered himself athletic. Shortly after his conversation with Dr. Smith, Martin received the chance of a lifetime and was asked to be a part of the 2013 Warrior Games.

Smith, Martin divingThe Warrior Games showcase the spirit of competition for wounded, ill or injured service members from all military branches. He made the swim team and won the silver medal in the below knee amputee category. “It was one of the greatest moments of my life and one of my biggest accomplishments,” said Martin. “Dr. Smith was really my motivation to go beyond what I believed I could do at that point in time in my life.”

“I’m glad that as a team, we were able to get Martin back to where he once was in his life. He is an extraordinary person who just needed a little support to believe in himself again,” said Dr. Smith.

Martin plans on retiring from the military this year and may consider competing in the Warrior Games again next year. His goal is to ride a motorcycle and share this hobby with his wife again. Martin says he owes his current life to Dr. Smith and MOTUS and the medical expertise they gave him during the most difficult time of his life. “I want to thank Dr. Smith for kicking my butt and getting me back to living my life!”

 

Total Ankle Replacement: Marc’s Story

There’s nothing like revving up the engine of a vintage motorcycle for 57-year old Marc Defur. The sound, the smell, the feeling of riding the wide open road, it’s no wonder why building and restoring these classics are his passion. But like these worn down roadsters, Marc was also feeling his own wear and tear and needed a tune-up. “All of a sudden it became very painful to walk. I started walking with a limp and it was painful to ride my motorcycle, I knew something wasn’t right,” explains Marc.

MarcMoabTruck09

Marc was starting to experience severe ankle arthritis, a condition seen with age or prior trauma such as an ankle fracture or sprain. His arthritis was so severe, there was hardly any cartilage left in his ankle. “I was in extreme pain and my entire quality of life went down,” he explains. After a couple years of feeling this extreme pain, Marc decided to go see his physician and was referred to orthopaedic surgeon, Dr. Fran Faro at Swedish Medical Center. “Marc was the perfect candidate for a total ankle replacement. Ankle fusion is usually the standard procedure for this type of ankle injury but because of his age, having a total ankle replacement was the preferred choice,” says Faro.

Marc’s case would be the first total ankle replacement in the last decade to be performed at Swedish Medical Center. “This type of surgery was uncommon in the past but is now becoming more common because of the technology we have. On average there are about 3,000 procedures performed each year in the U.S.,” explains Faro.

The total ankle procedure has been performed on patients since the 1970’s. The new re-designed implants help patients have less pain, better range of motion and full function after surgery. “The recovery was so short. I was out of my walking cast and back on my motorcycle after two months,” says Marc.

MontroseDelta RideMarc’s new ankle is expected to last 10 or more years. “It’s a life saver; it gave me so much back in my life!”

 

How to Prepare for Orthopaedic Joint Replacement Surgery at Swedish Medical Center

If you will soon be heading to the hospital for orthopedic surgery, remember that your surgery is designed to improve your quality of life. Getting informed is a great way to prepare for your upcoming surgery and can help ease any anxiety you may have before surgery. Continue reading to learn how to prepare for the different stages of your surgical treatment.

  • Before Surgery: According to Dr. James T. Muffly, Swedish Medical Center orthopaedic surgeon, “One of the many strengths of the newly opened Swedish Orthopaedic Center is the emphasis on preparation prior to your joint replacement surgery.  Swedish Medical Center has an excellent Joint Education Class and Pre-Admission Clinic that are both informative and help ease many of the common concerns regarding your hospitalization.” Swedish Medical Center provides you with a Joint Instruction Booklet that outlines specific instructions, which will likely include not eating or drinking anything after midnight on the night before your surgery. Abstain from wearing makeup or lotion on any part of your body, and be sure to bring a few items with you to ensure that you are comfortable during your stay. These items may include your eyeglasses or contact lenses with a case, and a comfortable pair of shoes. You may also want a short robe that opens in the front, a comfortable and loose-fitting outfit, personal hygiene items, and slippers.  Do not bring valuable items such as laptops or jewelry. Leave your medications at home unless otherwise instructed by your doctor. Make sure you discuss your medications with your doctor. If your doctor prescribes medicine before the surgery, be sure to follow his or her directions closely.
  • The Day of Surgery: Dr. Muffly states, “ The entire staff at the Swedish Orthopaedic Joint Center have one common goal in mind which is to keep you and your family informed and listen to any concerns that you may have.  Whether it is the check-in process, the anesthesia, the surgery, or the recovery unit – at every step we want you to feel that each went smoothly and was worry free.”
  • After surgery: You will have a team of physical and occupational therapists, orthopaedic nurses, aides, doctors, and discharge planners that monitor your progress and start you on your road to recovery with your new joint replacement

From the personal attention to the state of the art medical care, Dr. Muffly wants each patient to tell a friend, “I’m thrilled that I chose Swedish Medical Center for my joint replacement.”

For top-notch medical care from experienced and dedicated professionals, come to Swedish Medical Center, a Level 1 Trauma Center in Denver, Colorado. We will be more than happy to answer all of your questions, so call us at (303) 788-5000.

Common Sports Injury: The ACL

The anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL, connects the femur to the top of the tibia and is essential for knee stabilization. Because of its active role in knee movement, this ligament is easily injured or torn, especially in sports that involve rapid pivoting or twisting from side to side.

This video is a brief introduction to ACL injury. It provides more information about the major causes of injuries and describes who may be at a higher risk for ACL tears. Watch to learn more.

At Swedish Medical Center, the entire sixth floor of our Denver hospital is dedicated to caring for our orthopedic patients. At Swedish, our team of orthopedic surgeons specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of high-energy musculoskeletal injuries, fractures from multiple traumas, intra-articular fractures and complex pelvic and acetabular fractures. Our experienced staff strives to bring each of our patients back to their accustomed levels of mobility and activity. Call us today at (303) 788-5000 to learn more about our comprehensive healthcare services.